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PostPosted: Tue Oct 19, 2010 9:02 pm 
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I have a 6yr old male Shar-Pei. Took him to the Vet yesterday to have him checked due to throwing up for about a week stright. I got the shock of my life when I was told he was in renal failure. His BUN was 135 and there were 2 other levels that were very high, but to be honest I stopped hearing after he said renal failure. My vet told me to push fluids through him tonight, and see if he urniates (which he did) and see if we can re-stimultie his kidneys. He also told me that if we could not get his kidneys re-stimulated and him holding down food and water that he probbly only has about 2 weeks left. I am crushed!! Just wondering where we should go from here? Is there Hope? Whats next? I have read alot on Azodyl supplement, any opions on that? I dont want to loose my baby but I dont want to make him suffer either!

Today he has held everything down, I have start under the skin fluid at home, and is still drinking on his own. However his activity level has decreased as the day passed. The vet game me KD Science Diet, I bought some Samon Oil to enhance the flavor of his food. However I have read so many conflicting things about what type of meat I can cook and add in with the Dog Food, so needless to say I am soooooo confused!! I have a copy of the lab results I will scan and post in just a few.

I am not ready to loose my boy yet!!! I told my husband just the other day, its soooo great to come home to my dogs because they are the only two in the world who is ALWAYS happy to see me, they don't judge, dont have expections, and they always are right beside me no matter what!! All they need in return is me to love them and care for them. I have lost so much in the last year and I am NOT ready to loose him!


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PostPosted: Tue Oct 19, 2010 9:20 pm 
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I am so sorry that you are having to go through this with your baby....I've been there :(

Yes, please post the lab results and food.....whitefish is the best and sweet potatoes green beans.

Azodyl is good, i used that too, Murphi took 1 in the AM and 2 in the PM

Was he ever on a protocol for fevers?


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PostPosted: Tue Oct 19, 2010 9:21 pm 
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I am so sorry to hear this about your boy. What is his name? You have alot of reading to do. Here are a few threads where others either have faced or are dealing with renal failure in their beloved Sharpei. Some of these threads are long, but I think you will find much helpful information there.

I suggest you take notes and jot down questions as they arise. Also there are lnks within these topics that will be good for you to follow.

http://sharpeiforums.com/viewtopic.php?f=4&t=16501&hilit=renal+failure

http://sharpeiforums.com/viewtopic.php?f=8&t=16866&hilit=renal+failure

http://sharpeiforums.com/viewtopic.php?f=10&t=16283&p=228150&hilit=renal+failure#p228150

http://sharpeiforums.com/viewtopic.php?f=4&t=16262&p=220313&hilit=renal+failure#p220313

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PostPosted: Tue Oct 19, 2010 10:07 pm 
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You have come to a place where many of us have shared the roller coaster of emotion you are riding now. It is a giant kick in your stomach and in your heart. Some peis are able to improve with treatment and care, some are not. I pray that your boy will be one of the lucky ones. It is very good that he is able to urinate. That is a good start and reason for hope.

You have been given a lot of direction for reading. You can only take this one step at a time, and only so much is in your control. We will be sending prayers and looking forward to reading his test results and offering whatever advice we can.

Michele


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PostPosted: Wed Oct 20, 2010 7:16 am 
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so sorry your peiby is in KF :( many of us have been in your shoes and know how helpless you feel, azodyl is worth a shot, fluids are essential, good fresh high quality food, low stress, vitamin b-12 shots for energy and appetite, epakitin if his phos is high, the fluids can bring his Bun down. he might need pepcid at some point too. i lost 2 pei to this disease, and am currently managing 1 now. my girls died of amyloidosis, alot of pei end up with renal failure due to amyloid, not all KF is amyloid related though, amyloid deposits in the organs and there is no cure for it, it invades the liver often too. we will pray for your peiby

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PostPosted: Wed Oct 20, 2010 7:35 am 
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Thinking of you today


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PostPosted: Wed Oct 20, 2010 7:40 am 
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Going to dogware.com and k9kidneys@yahoogroups.com Can give you so much help
drugs,over the counter,diet ,subQ
They are up on everything.

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PostPosted: Wed Oct 20, 2010 7:40 am 
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Prayers!


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PostPosted: Wed Oct 20, 2010 7:47 am 
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I'm so sorry for you. 6 years is still so young! I'll make some prayers for your dog.

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PostPosted: Wed Oct 20, 2010 9:58 am 
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Welcome! Im just seeing this now. I am so sorry your Peiby is going thru this. Some can be managed for quite a while so dont panic yet. Good advice here and resources (like the kidney dog forum). Lots of topics here on this too.

Lets see what the flush does and post test results too and we can go from there.

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PostPosted: Wed Oct 20, 2010 11:05 am 
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Thank You all for the prayers! I am getting ready to make him somthing to eat, and do his under the skin fluid (which is great about, does like it but allows me to do it. I have attached his blood work.


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PostPosted: Wed Oct 20, 2010 11:14 am 
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Ok could not get his results to upload says file is too big, so here is what the levels are:
WBC- 7.9
RCB- 6.89
HGB-13.0
HCT-40.2
PLATELET Ct. 440
Cholesterol- 384
Glucose-79
BUN-158
Creatinine- 11.9
Total Protein- 7.2
Albumin-3.1
Amylase-1534
ALT (SGPT)-38
AST (SGOT)-30
Phosphorus- 10.7
Alk Phos- 88
Calcium- 9.0
Bilirub (tot)- 0.1
Sodium- 140
Potassium- 4.3


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PostPosted: Wed Oct 20, 2010 12:04 pm 
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Just feed him and did fluids, he threw up minutes after me feeding :( He wont touch the dog food, so ihave had to cook some different combos of food, he really justwants the meat. Not sure yet what all kida meat he can have.


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PostPosted: Wed Oct 20, 2010 1:40 pm 
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A little at a time, whatever he will eat,whether that's canned or chicken nuggets!


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PostPosted: Wed Oct 20, 2010 2:13 pm 
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I scrambled up some hamburger meat with some egg whites, which he ate. He loves chicken, and any other kind of meat. yesterday I got him to eat a can of tuna ( I know that cant be good for him), but I am grasping at straws. He is very inactive today, not his self at all, it breaks my heart!


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PostPosted: Wed Oct 20, 2010 3:54 pm 
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It is heartbreaking, but he is eating and keeping it down and that is good.

Did you get a chance to read through the topics I posted for you?

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PostPosted: Wed Oct 20, 2010 4:04 pm 
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I came to this board for the same reason. My Peiby - Bella - looks like she is starting the process with Amyloidosis. She's now 4 1/2. In January, she started with her first fever and swollen hock. We started colcichine and the fatty acid food supplements. She has an episode about every 4-6 weeks on average and takes Metacam during the flare-up. However, this last episode on Monday night was only 1 week after the last one. She has completely lost her appetite. I took her to the vet on Tuesday as I also noticed her increased thirst/water intake as well as her urine not being concentrated. While her BUN/Creatinine are normal now, she is spilling large protein amounts (UPC > 10) in her urine. With her WBC high, he also wanted to cover her with antibiotics. We go back to the vet on Friday morning - he wanted the episode and inflammation to pass before starting any regimen. The only things I can really get her to eat are duck jerky and plain hamburgers. I guess that will do until we see him again. She hasn't lost weight, but her lack of appetite is stressing me out.

It scares me too that I could be facing loosing this little girl. I have become so attached to her. While I lost my other Pei to cancer, he was 11 and had a long full life. It was sad, but this process doesn't seem fair to happen to one that is so active, playful, and young.


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PostPosted: Wed Oct 20, 2010 4:33 pm 
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bellasmom06 wrote:
It was sad, but this process doesn't seem fair to happen to one that is so active, playful, and young.


This is a classic understatement... unfair doesn't even begin to cover it. You can have a seemingly totally happy and healthy puppy one day, and then it's like someone flips the switch.

It is nearly impossible to wrap your brain around the diagnosis. My boy was gone in 48 hours. I am still stunned.

This is why so many of us are passionate about breeding and the casual manner in which some people just say "Well, it's in all the lines." I know that is never said by someone who has walked in your shoes, trying to slow the progression of the disease and improve the quality of the lives of our beloved peibies.

I hope that treatment helps both your peis to longer quality lives. It's just too hard to bear. We have no choice except to do the best we can.

Michele


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PostPosted: Wed Oct 20, 2010 5:01 pm 
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I lost my girl at 5. I'm so sorry to hear about your beloved boy. My girl couldn't eat much either. I just kept trying anything that she'd eat. I was down to Chik-fil-A chicken (she wouldn't eat boiled chicken anymore). We were soooo heartbroken when we lost her. We still talk about her all the time and get emotional about missing her so much.

Prayers for you and the pup.

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PostPosted: Thu Oct 21, 2010 9:15 am 
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Big Hug for you and don't lose hope ,this can still turn around.


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PostPosted: Thu Oct 21, 2010 12:01 pm 
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Doubrava wrote:
Just feed him and did fluids, he threw up minutes after me feeding :( He wont touch the dog food, so ihave had to cook some different combos of food, he really justwants the meat. Not sure yet what all kida meat he can have.

Are you giving him anything for vomiting?
What are all the meds that you are giving him?


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PostPosted: Thu Oct 21, 2010 8:23 pm 
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The Vet just gave us somthing today for the vomiting, but other then that just the fluids. The Vet wants to see how well his body flushes out the toxins without any other meds, he will re check his labs next week. Today has been some what better. He did throw up this afternoon, which looked like green biel. However I gave him his fluids under the skin and he felt better. He ate some chicken and carrots, and ate the same again this evening. He has urinated very well today, so I am taking that as a good sign, and I have not had to use the Nausea Med yet. :?


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PostPosted: Thu Oct 21, 2010 9:55 pm 
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He actually needs to be on something for the liver as well as meds for his kidneys.

My old vet that i was taking Murphi to was only treating the kidneys....his liver is what took his life.

He needs something for liver and kidneys


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PostPosted: Thu Oct 21, 2010 10:26 pm 
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May or not be hepatic (liver) involvement here. Alk/Phos is still well withing normal range (Alkaline Phosphatase (ALKP): 23 - 212 U/L) according to my chart (see link below)...but I am not a Vet or other health care professional so I cannot interpret all the results and how they play into this.

Hepatic amyloidosis IS common though and it probably wouldnt hurt to maybe support liver function with some SamE & Milk Thistle. I would certainly avoid rancid fats and perhaps give some lecithin (2 tbspn) daily too.

http://www.caninecancerawareness.org/ht ... Hemoglobin

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PostPosted: Fri Oct 22, 2010 7:31 am 
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Found this on the net;

Quote:
Dietary Assistance for Dogs with Failing Kidneys:

Dietary changes for dogs with renal (kidney) insufficiency or failure may be helpful, but it is important to understand that they are not going to cure or even treat the disease itself. Diet modification merely gives the kidneys an easier job to do. It does little to help the function itself.

Because by-products of protein digestion are the main toxins that need to be excreted by the kidneys, an obvious assumption might be that all one needs to do is to cut out the protein and the kidneys wouldn't have any more hard work to do. Of course, things are never that simple. One certainly would not want to give an excessive amount of protein, but how much is too much? Dogs do have a minimum daily protein requirement, the amount of which depends on the quality of the protein being fed and on the health status of the animal. Proteins are graded on their "biologic value." High biologic value means that the protein is highly digestible, easily absorbed by the intestinal tract, and that its amino acid components (the building blocks of proteins) include all the essential types of amino acids in their optimal proportions. Egg protein and milk protein (casein) are the dietary proteins with the highest biologic value. Lean meat protein from muscle or organ meat, not meat by-products, are a close second. Normal, healthy dogs, with average activity levels, need approx. 3 - 3 1/2 gm of high-biological-value protein, "as fed," per lb. body weight per day. This translates into approximately 0.6 - 0.7 gm of dried cooked egg/lb/day. There is significant evidence, however, that the daily protein requirements actually increase slightly for dogs in chronic renal failure. Therefore, severely restricting the protein for such a dog is likely to result in protein malnutrition, in spite of the fact that the levels of blood urea nitrogen, or BUN (the primary by-product of protein metabolism) would be correspondingly lower. Typical prescription "kidney disease diets" formulated by various commercial pet food companies are designed to provide high quality protein in moderately restricted amounts (generally 0.9 gm of dry-weight protein/lb/day), while providing adequate caloric intake from non-protein ingredients. Further adjustment of the diet must be based upon the individual animal: (1) blood test evaluations of kidney function (e.g. BUN levels); (2) general appearance of the patient (e.g., muscle mass, maintenance of body weight; and (3) clinical assessment of health status. If the BUN levels are in a "good" range, but the dog is progressively losing weight, then the protein may have to be increased. Conversely, if the dog is maintaining adequate nutritional status, but the BUN is steadily climbing, then reducing the protein further may be of benefit.

Other dietary issues for dogs in chronic renal failure include (1) maintaining adequate caloric intake to keep other bodily processes functioning properly; (2) maintaining adequate levels of water soluble vitamins (B complex and vit.C); and (3) preventing excessive calcium loss because of the elevated phosphorus levels that develop secondarily in renal failure.

Caloric requirements are usually met by the addition of extra carbohydrates and fat to the diet. It is recommended that dogs receive 35 - 50 Cal./lb/day, on average, and that these amounts be tailored to meet the needs of the individual patient. The commercial kidney diets usually fulfill these requirements. To prevent excessive loss of the water soluble vitamins, supplementation of balanced B complex vitamins and Vitamin C is usually recommended. For dogs with excessive blood levels of phosphorus, a phosphorus binder such as Amphojel, Basaljel, or Alternagel, is given with each meal, in order to bind some of the phosphorus present in the food. The amounts of these supplements should be determined by the veterinarian, based on the status of the individual patient.

Kidney failure is a varied and complex disease, affecting many organ systems and affected by numerous intrinsic and extrinsic factors. Dietary management is only one factor that can affect the quality of a kidney patient's life. There are many others, which your veterinarian can discuss with you. Appetite loss, nausea, and other problems can complicate the picture and a number of symptomatic treatments can provide significant relief for a time. Fluid therapy, administered either intravenously or between the layers of the skin, can make a significant temporary improvement in the animal's clinical status. Unfortunately, most cases of chronic renal failure are cases of management, not cure. With that in mind, the "ideal treatment regimen" becomes secondary to the patient's quality of life. For example, if the dog has no appetite for the food he is "supposed" to eat, but wants something he is not supposed to have, the question arises, "Isn't it better to eat something than nothing?" If an antiulcer medication will decrease the nausea caused by excessive BUN levels, but the dog fights it bitterly, is it worth the battle? These are very difficult questions that all owners of kidney patients face. There are no easy answers, but the support of your veterinarian, the veterinary staff, and your circle of dog-friends can help you through a lot of them. Dietary management is only a portion of the bigger picture.

http://web.archive.org/web/20041208102742/http://www.dog.com/vet/nutrition/05.html

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